Anthony Riches: Wolf’s Gold Review

Anthony Riches's picture

Anthony Riches

Anthony Riches began his lifelong interest in war and soldiers when he first heard his father’s stories about World War II. This led to a degree in Military Studies at Manchester University. He began writing the story that would become Wounds of Honour after a visit to Housesteads in 1996. He lives in Hertfordshire with his wife and three children.

Books by Anthony Riches

Empire
1. Wounds of Honour (2009)
2. Arrows of Fury (2010)
3. Fortress of Spears (2011)
4. The Leopard Sword (2012)
5. The Wolf’s Gold (2012)
Wounds of HonourArrows of FuryFortress of SpearsThe Leopard Sword The Wolf's Gold
Latest Book: Wolf’s Gold
The Tungrian auxiliary cohorts march east to the land beyond the Danube to guard a frontier which turns out to be as dangerous and lawless as northern Britannia in Anthony Riches’ suspenseful new Empire novel. Fresh from their victory in Germania, Marcus Aquila and the Tungrians have been sent to Dacia, on the north-eastern edge of the Roman Empire, with the mission to safeguard a major source of imperial power. The mines of Alburnus Major contain enough gold to pave the road to Rome. They would make a mighty prize for the marauding Sarmatae tribesmen who threaten the province, and the outnumbered auxiliaries are entrusted with their safety in the face of a barbarian invasion. Beset by both the Sarmatian horde and more subtle threats offered by men who should be their comrades, the Tungrians must also come to terms with the danger posed by a new and unexpected enemy. They will have to fight to the death to save the honour of the empire – and their own skins.

Review:

When I read Leopard Sword 6 months ago I was shocked at how much further Anthony Riches story telling depth had increased, his books have always been my favourite in terms of pace and sheer fun, but Leopard Sword took it further with twists and turns that had never been there before. Wolf’s Gold keeps that improvement going and if possible squeaks past it in terms of great story telling.

I have to admit to several laugh out loud moments reading this book (and I would love to add one of the lines, but I don’t want to spoil the fun for you all) my favourite concerns a beard and tickling (I laughed, and choked on my drink). It’s this sheer fun and enjoyment that Tony brings to his readers as well as well thought out, well researched plot lines. Once again he is merciless with his characters, no one is safe, I was stunned by the casual death of someone who was a well established character, and how soon he was less than a memory. A chilling but honest way to portray how warriors must have been back then, how they must have been, to be able to cope with all the death around them. It’s this kind of subtlety and attention to detail that puts Tony at the forefront of Historical Fiction writing , whilst still retaining his trademark writing ability that drags the reader along at breakneck spread from first page to last.

The back story of Marcus is added to in Wolf’s Gold ti a greater degree than many of the other books in the series and in a very tantalising fashion, with hints of what happened, to who and by whom. Leaving many more questions, Will he go to Rome? if he does how can he retain his current position? Who will remain alive long enough to help him? (he is a dangerous man to be friends with). The scope of expansion for this series is mind bogglingly huge.

Another reason to buy this book and all of the series, is the way as each book is written Tony brings a more human element to more and more of the characters, to how we see more of each man, not just the fighter and his friends but how they’ve all grown from book to book, and how they have grown as a group.

I just hope that Tony can keep up the pace of writing and give me the next book in 6 months… I’m not sure I can wait much longer than that.

One of my favourite reads this year and Very Highly recommended (as is the whole series)

(Parm)

Advertisements

2 Comments

Filed under Historical Fiction

2 responses to “Anthony Riches: Wolf’s Gold Review

  1. Pingback: My stand out books, and Fav’s of 2012, and the publishers who do so much for me and others. | parmenionbooks

  2. Pingback: Anthony Riches Thunder of the Gods (2015) Review | parmenionbooks

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s