David Gibbins: Sword of Attila (Review)

David Gibbins's picture

David Gibbins

Canada (1962 – )

David Gibbins has worked in underwater archaeology all his professional life. After taking a PhD from Cambridge University he taught archaeology in Britain and abroad, and is a world authority on ancient shipwrecks and sunken cities. He has led numerous expeditions to investigate underwater sites in the Mediterranean and around the world. He currently divides his time between fieldwork, England and Canada.

The fall of Rome was just the beginning. A new empire will rise . . .

The Sword of Attila (2015)

(The second book in the Total War Rome series)
A novel by David Gibbins

Sword of Attila
AD 439: the Roman Empire is on the brink of collapse. With shocking speed a Vandal army has swept through the Roman provinces of Spain and north Africa, conquering Carthage and threatening Roman control of the Mediterranean. But a far greater threat lies to the east, a barbarian force born in the harsh steppelands of Asia, warriors of unparalleled savagery who will sweep all before them in their thirst for conquest – the army of Attila the Hun.

For a small group of Roman soldiers and a mysterious British monk, the only defence is to rise above the corruption and weakness of the Roman emperors and hark back to the glory days of the Roman army centuries before, to find strength in history. But then they devise a plan of astonishing audacity that will take them to the heart of darkness itself, to the stronghold of the most feared warrior-king the world has ever known. In the showdown to come, in the greatest battle the Romans have ever fought, victory will go to those who can hold high the most potent symbol of war ever wrought by man – the sacred sword of Attila.

Review:

Book one in this novel new series, starts with the real birth of the roman empire, the sacking of Carthage, the beginning of their real power in the Mediterranean. Book 2 The Sword of Attila focuses on the end of the empire, Rome has been sacked a hundred years previously by the goths, and are now on the verge of being kicked out of Africa by the vandals. In the east a new power is rising ruling over the Hun.

A much underwritten part of the Roman history, yet there is so much rich, action packed history to delve into. David Gibbins as usual provides immaculate research, he then couples it with highly plausible fictional action. This series is linked to a computer game, it is potentially its flaw, the book provides the reader with all the knowledge needed to play and win the game, to understand the history, and all the elements in it. The soldiers their equipment, the countries the alliances and so much more, so much in fact each book could and maybe should be a series on its own. It is this that made me struggle a little with book one, book two however had the winning extra of including a fictional but highly plausible character Arturus, a dark age figure tied to British folklore and myth. As with so much of David Gibbins amazing Jack Howard series, he gives enough fact to the fictional to show just how possible the it is for Arturus to have existed in this way, and been the basis for the myth.

Arturus, coupled with Flavius and many other very real characters really make this book, the occasionally slightly stilted plot (by this im using the comparison of the flowing plot that is the Jack Howard series) is more than made up for with scope, the characters and the copious author notes at the end, making this a very very readable, enjoyable 4/5 stars.

(Parm)

Jack Howard
1. Atlantis (2005)
2. Crusader Gold (2006)
3. The Last Gospel (2008)
aka The Lost Tomb
4. The Tiger Warrior (2009)
5. The Mask of Troy (2010)
6. The Gods of Atlantis (2011)
aka Atlantis God
7. Pharaoh (2013)

9. Pyramid (2014)

AtlantisCrusader GoldThe Last GospelThe Tiger WarriorThe Mask of TroyThe Gods of AtlantisPharaohPyramid

Total War Rome
1. Destroy Carthage (2013)
2. The Sword of Attila (2015)
Destroy CarthageThe Sword of Attila
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1 Comment

Filed under David Gibbins, Historical Fiction

One response to “David Gibbins: Sword of Attila (Review)

  1. Pingback: David Gibbins: Testament (Review) | parmenionbooks

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