Robert Fabbri : Alexander’s Legacy: To the Strongest

book cover of To The Strongest

Let the battles begin…

‘I foresee great struggles at my funeral games.’

Babylon, 323 BC: Alexander the Great is dead, leaving behind him the largest, and most fearsome, empire the world has ever seen. As his final breaths fade in a room of seven bodyguards, Alexander refuses to name a successor. But without a natural heir, who will take the reins?

As the news of the king’s sudden and unexpected death ripples across the land, leaving all in disbelief, the ruthless battle for the throne begins. What follows is a devious, tangled web of scheming and plotting, with alliances quickly made and easily broken, each rival with their own agenda.

But who will emerge victorious: the half-chosen; the one-eyed; the wildcat; the general; the bastard; the regent? In the end, only one man, or indeed woman, will be left standing..

 

Review

I’ve been a fan of Robert fabbri and his writing since Tribune of Rome came out in 2011, and to hear that he was tackling one of my favorite historical characters (Alexander) was a real buzz, even more so when i learned that the series would begin at the end, the end of Alexanders life. The turmoil his passing unleashed across his empire was huge and changed the face of the ancient world, there was and is so much scope and so many hugely interesting characters.

Fabbri keeps in the main to real historical personages in this book, only interspersing the occasional fictional character, he brings those historical notables to life, and i have to say from the start Eumenes is my stand out favorite… who doesn’t love an underdog and a devious Greek one, Fabbri really brings that out in his writing, but he is just one of the many stunning characters in the book as we watch the great men and women of the time vie for power and control of the great empire Alexander carved. Many times its mentioned that Alexander didn’t name a successor because he wanted this division and strife and he wanted no one to eclipse his achievements…. if that really was his intention then Robert Fabbri captures it brilliantly.

If i had to have one nagging annoyance at the book it was the way it was structured, changes of time and location were not defined in the book, eg Eumenes could be talking about Cassandra and what his intentions were and on the next line he was talking to her, even though that may be a day or week later in another town, it just happened on the next line…. that was somewhat confusing for a while and threw off the pace of the book for me.

But the story is stunning, the politics of the time is just mind boggling but told in a pacy engaging way, the battles and the warriors brought to life in vivid detail, i love it when the writer can transport you to the dust , the muck, the blood sweat and horror of a battle and also the stress and frustration of the politics… as usual Robert fabbri does not disappoint in this.

Im really looking forward to the next in this series, this is one of the great periods of history, told with true style.

Highly reccomended

(Parm)

Series
Vespasian
   1. Tribune of Rome (2011)
   2. Rome’s Executioner (2012)
   3. False God of Rome (2013)
   4. Rome’s Fallen Eagle (2013)
   5. Masters of Rome (2014)
   6. Rome’s Lost Son (2015)
   7. Furies of Rome (2016)
   8. Rome’s Sacred Flame (2018)
   9. Emperor of Rome (2019)
   The Succession (2018)
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Crossroads Brotherhood
   1. The Crossroads Brotherhood (2011)
   2. The Racing Factions (2013)
   3. The Dreams of Morpheus (2014)
   4. The Alexandrian Embassy (2015)
   5. The Imperial Triumph (2017)
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Alexander’s Legacy
   1. To The Strongest (2020)
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Novels
   Arminius (2017)
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Filed under Historical Fiction, Robert Fabbri, Uncategorized

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