Paul Fraser Collard: The True Soldier (Review)

Paul Fraser Collard

Paul Fraser Collard's picture

UK flag (1973 – )

Paul’s love of military history started at an early age. A childhood spent watching films like Waterloo and Zulu whilst reading Sharpe, Flashman and the occasional Commando comic, gave him a desire to know more of the men who fought in the great wars of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries. At school, Paul was determined to become an officer in the British army and he succeeded in wining an Army Scholarship. However, Paul chose to give up his boyhood ambition and instead went into the finance industry. Paul stills works in the City, and lives with his wife and three children in Kent.

The True Soldier  (2017)
(The sixth book in the Jack Lark series)
book cover of The True Soldier

April, 1861. Jack Lark arrives in Boston as civil war storms across America.

A hardened soldier, Jack has always gone where he was ordered to go – and killed the enemy he was ordered to kill. But when he becomes a sergeant for the Union army, he realises that this conflict between North and South is different. Men are choosing to fight – and die – for a cause they believe in.

The people of Boston think it will take just one, great battle. But, with years of experience, Jack knows better. This is the beginning of something that will tear a country apart – and force Jack to see what he is truly fighting for.

Review

I have to be transparent from the start, i’m a HUGE fan of this series, If any writer has managed to capture the spirit and adventure of Sharpe and the daring of his character then its Paul Collard, but he has done it in his own unique way with his own unique character, Jack Lark. ( Jack Lark v Sharpe).

What this series has (for me) more than Bernard Cornwells Sharpe is a disquiet about war. Jack like Sharp is a beast of war, but Jack Lark sees and feels the darkness and futility of war, he like Sharpe has also been on both sides of the army line, both soldier and officer, but his was always riven with fear of being discovered. But no longer, now Jack is himself and essentially a mercenary, he is in America and Civil War has begun, Jack has been tasked with looking after a rich mans son, but Jack is also a consummate professional, and can’t help but impose his skills on his men, to turn them into the best fighting men they can be.

When i started reading this book i felt it had a slight melancholy edge, one that blended perfectly with the feelings i experienced after waking to the Manchester bombings, joining Jack in that feeling of hopelessness and darkness, Paul Collard had captured that feeling so well, the futility of all that death. The book moves on from there, but gone is the Jack we knew, he is older, and no longer having to hide who he is. But does he like who he has found himself to be, he like America is searching for his identity, fighting to make a place for himself.

This is the best book Paul Collard has written, the most accomplished with the most mature writing, i did tell him it wasn’t my fav read when i was about 30% in, but i was wrong, it is. As the book progressed it worked its magic on me and it made me love it so much so that once again i miss Jack Lark his absence leave a hole that hard for another book to fill, a year is a long time to wait until his next adventure but the wait i’m sure will be worth it as there is so much detail and depth, and so many places for Jack to be Jack in a Civil War torn USA.

Very Highly Recommended

(Parm)

Buy a Signed Copy

 

Series
Jack Lark
0.5. Rogue (2014)
1. The Scarlet Thief (2013)
2. The Maharajah’s General (2013)
3. The Devil’s Assassin (2015)
4. The Lone Warrior (2015)
5. The Last Legionnaire (2016)
aka The Forgotten Son
6. The True Soldier (2017)
Recruit (2015)
Redcoat (2015)
The Jack Lark Library (omnibus) (2017)
thumbthumbthumbthumb
thumbthumbthumbthumb
thumbthumb

Leave a comment

Filed under Historical Fiction, Paul Fraser Collard

James Heneage: By Blood Divided (review)

By Blood Divided blog tour poster.jpg

James Heneage's picture

James Heneage has been fascinated by history from an early age, in particular the rise and fall of empires. He was the founder of the Ottakars chain of bookshops which, between 1987 and 2006 grew to 150 branches before being bought by Waterstones. James spent these twenty years reading and researching historical subjects before settling on the end of the Byzantine Empire as the period he wanted to write about.

After Ottakars, he chaired the Cheltenham Literary Festival before setting up his own festival entirely devoted to history with author James Holland. The Daily Mail Chalke Valley History Festival is now in its third year and attracts around 30,000 people to its menu of talks, debates and living history displays.

The first of his Mistra Chronicles, The Walls of Byzantium, was launched at the Festival in June 2013.

book cover of By Blood Divided

Siward, scion of a great dynasty, commands the Varangian Guard and has vowed to defend the Roman Empire to the last.

Makkim, renowned general to Ottoman rule, has vowed to destroy it. They are enemies in war, but unknown to them, they are also rivals to inherit one of Europe’s greatest fortunes. Even worse, they are competing for the love of the same woman .Their vast inheritance lies in Venice, as does the famous courtesan they both love. She is the reason they will find themselves fighting on the walls of Constantinople, in one of the most dramatic sieges in history.

Review

I always think when i pick up a book by James Heneage that i’m about to embark on an epic, and as such need to slow down my expectations, wade through a slow burn of meticulous detail, but ultimately come out the other end educated. I’m not sure if its the name, or the fantastically intricate covers… its just an instinctive feeling. Yet nothing could be further from the truth, all the books especially this latest one, are fast paced action packed and full of passion for the subject at hand.

Set during the 15th Century at a turning point in history, east hit west in one of the greatest most dramatic and significant sieges in history, Constantinople.  Siward Margoris the young commander of the Varangian Guard, the legacy of British/ Viking warriors, sworn to defend the Roman Empire to the last set against him is Makkim General of the Ottoman army who seeks to destroy everything the Romans stands for. This is East v’s West, for the destruction of last remanant of the Roman Empire, a clash of religions. Wrapped around it all is a tale of family, love and money.

If i had to criticize anything it would be some of the weapon knowledge, EG: at the start a volley fire from bows at 500 paces destroyed an attack, that range is far to far, an average pace i s0.75m x 500 is 375m, that’s 410 yards, The current world record is about 360 yards and about the maximum distance expected in historic periods, and at this extreme range, accuracy is sacrificed to a storm of arrows, which this passage in the book didn’t have. Now i don’t expect to find utter accuracy, but to drift into the realms of fantasy was a bit much for me (but it’s my sport so I’m picky).

Would i recommend this book, absolutely i would, and all the previous books by this author. I would not only say they are a wonderfully engaging read, with a passion for the characters and subject that shines through, but they also look blooming amazing on the shelf, the covers are simply stand out amazingly vivid.

Go read… promise you will not regret it… but if you’re and archer… forgive the trespasses.

(Parm)

 

Mistra Chronicles / Rise of Empires Chronicles
1. The Walls of Byzantium (2013)
2. The Towers of Samarcand (2014)
3. The Lion of Mistra (2015)
4. By Blood Divided (2017)
Rise of Empires Omnibus (omnibus) (2015)
thumbthumbthumbthumb
thumb

Leave a comment

Filed under Historical Fiction, James Heneage

Ben Aaronovitch The Furthest Station (5.7 Peter Grant / Rivers of London)

Ben Aaronovitch

Ben Aaronovitch’s career started with a bang writing for Doctor Who, subsided in the middle and then, as is traditional, a third act resurgence with the bestselling Rivers of London series.

Born and raised in London he says that he’ll leave his home when they prise his city out of his cold dead fingers.

31626329

There have been ghosts on the London Underground, sad, harmless spectres whose presence does little more than give a frisson to travelling and boost tourism. But now there’s a rash of sightings on the Metropolitan Line and these ghosts are frightening, aggressive and seem to be looking for something.

Enter PC Peter Grant junior member of the Metropolitan Police’s Special Assessment unit a.k.a. The Folly a.k.a. the only police officers whose official duties include ghost hunting. Together with Jaget Kumar, his counterpart at the British Transport Police, he must brave the terrifying the crush of London’s rush hour to find the source of the ghosts.

Joined by Peter’s wannabe wizard cousin, a preschool river god and Toby the ghost hunting dog their investigation takes a darker tone as they realise that a real person’s life might just be on the line.

And time is running out to save them.

Review

Furthest Station, actually works, i wasn’t sure if a novella would be enough to tell a PC Grant tale, but actually it worked perfectly, More so in fact than the Hanging Tree did for me, which seemed to just stop.

As with many mid series novellas a large part of this book is dropping hints, tit bits and introducing people who we will see more of later, but this was a lot more than that, it had all the charismatic humour that you expect from this series, all the innate British humour, and i think even funnier, the netgalley copy i had was for the USA, it had notes to explain some English vernacular for the Americans, those made me chuckle and should always be in there.

So this book is mainly i think about us seeing more and more of Peters wannabe Wizard cousin, and why not, she is smart, very smart. Has that usual smart mouth approach and condescending view of all people older and stupider than her (and lets face it thats a lot of people, she is very smart) .. As usual the author pays all the characters very well, true laugh out loud moments, groans  and a plot and pace that means the book is over in a blink. It leave you wanting more…. and that for me is the sign of a good book. Hanging Tree left me going…. wheres the rest… that’s not the same thing!

So lots more Mr Aaronovitch and soon please…

(Parm)

 

Series
PC Peter Grant
1. Rivers of London (2011)
aka Midnight Riot
2. Moon Over Soho (2011)
3. Whispers Under Ground (2012)
4. Broken Homes (2013)
5. Foxglove Summer (2014)
6. The Hanging Tree (2016)
P C Grant Novels (omnibus) (2013)
Ben Aaronovitch The PC Grant Novels 4 Books Collection Set, (omnibus) (2015)
The Furthest Station (2017)
The PC Grant Collection (2017)
thumbthumbthumbthumb
thumbthumbthumbthumb
thumb
Series contributed to
Doctor Who : Seventh Doctor
Remembrance of the Daleks (1990)
thumb
Doctor Who : New Adventures
10. Transit (1992)
44. The Also People (1995)
56. So Vile a Sin (1997) (with Kate Orman)
thumbthumbthumb
Professor Bernice Summerfield
Genius Loci (2007)
thumb
Doctor Who (with Trevor Baxendale)
Remembrance of the Daleks / Prisoner of the Daleks(2016)
thumb

1 Comment

Filed under Ben Aaronovitch, Fantasy

Sebastien De Castell : Tyrant’s Throne (Review)

Image result for Sebastien De Castell

Author Web site

Sebastien de Castell had just finished a degree in Archaeology when he started work on his first dig. Four hours later he realized how much he actually hated archaeology and left to pursue a very focused career as a musician, ombudsman, interaction designer, fight choreographer, teacher, project manager, actor, and product strategist. His only defence against the charge of unbridled dilettantism is that he genuinely likes doing these things and that, in one way or another, each of these fields plays a role in his writing. He sternly resists the accusation of being a Renaissance Man in the hopes that more people will label him that way.

Sebastien is the author of the acclaimed swashbuckling fantasy series, The Greatcoats. His debut novel, Traitor’s Blade, was shortlisted for both the 2014 Goodreads Choice Award for Best Fantasy and the Gemmell Morningstar Award for Best Debut. He lives in Vancouver, Canada with his lovely wife and two belligerent cats.

Tyrant’s Throne  (2017)
(The fourth book in the Greatcoats series)

book cover of Tyrant's Throne

After years of struggle and sacrifice, Falcio val Mond, First Cantor of the Greatcoats, is on the brink of fulfilling his dead king’s dream: Aline, the king’s daughter, is about to take the throne and restore the rule of law once and for all.

But for the Greatcoats, nothing is ever that simple. In the neighboring country of Avares, an enigmatic new warlord is uniting the barbarian armies that have long plagued Tristia’s borders–and even worse, he is rumored to have a new ally: Trin, who’s twice tried to kill Aline to claim the throne of Tristia for herself. With the armies of Avares at her back, led by a bloodthirsty warrior, she’ll be unstoppable.

Falcio, Kest, and Brasti race north to stop her, but in those cold and treacherous climes they discover something altogether different, and far more dangerous: a new player is planning to take the throne of Tristia, and with a sense of dread the three friends realize that the Greatcoats, for all their skill, may not be able to stop him.

As the nobles of Tristia and even the Greatcoats themselves fight over who should rule, the Warlord of Avares threatens to invade. With so many powerful contenders vying for power, it will fall to Falcio to render the one verdict he cannot bring himself to utter, much less enforce. Should he help crown the young woman he vowed to put on the throne, or uphold the laws he swore to serve?

Buy a signed Copy

Review

There are many books you can ruin with a review, this is truly one of them, as such i will stick only to how much i enjoyed it, not what its about. To give away any of the story would be to ruin the magic, the tragedy, the action and fun that awaits in every sentence on every page of this wonderful book and series.

Since i got my hands on book one of this series in 2014 i have been a huge fan and supporter of the series. It for me has always held the magic and mystery that is invoked by the tales of Dumas and the musketeers (a set of characters that captivated me as a child). The great coats having the je ne sais quoi of those 4 daring heroes of France, fighting not only those outside the law but also those rich conniving self serving traitors within the kings court.

Over there years there has been so many differing styles of Athos, Aramis, Porthos, Milady de Winter and D’Artagnan, Falcio and his cohorts bring to mind a mix of the 1993 Kiefer Sutherland era and the current BBC series. A more rough and tumble mixed with humor and sarcasm band of brothers. But this series is not just a play on an old favourite, it is so much more, the author plays with modern politics and the cynicism of this age, and mixes it with the differing ends of the spectrum of heroic fantasy. Our heroes are the epitome of what they stand for, ‘the law, honour and friendship’, and yet they must within that restriction navigate a cruel corrupt regime, dispensing justice to those who hate them or deride them.

This entire series has been written with a flair for the dramatic, the noble gesture, the  dangling of hope for the reader only to have it cruelly ripped away with a cold bath of reality. Yet not once does it ever phase our group of heroes, Falcio driven by his past to never fail, to always risk all on a daring plan, Brasti with his droll ever present wit and eagle eye both for a target and often the root of the problem and Kest who calculates every action every motive every scenario so that Falcio can then save them all with a large dollop of improbably action written in a way to make it all just so real, and improbability hidden in the spinning silvery blades and destructive power of Brasti’s bad jokes and deadly arrows.

This final book for me felt more alive and more emotional than the previous three, im not sure if it was the knowledge that it was the last (of the current crop….) I like to think its because the story was just that much more hard hitting, with a hugely explosive and emotive plot hidden among all the daring exploits, the shocking revelations and the inevitable failings as the group once more tried to save their world. I know for me it packed a huge punch and i shall miss them all. This is a series that has been read and re-read, and that’s not something i have time or patience for these days, except for the truly brilliant books/ series.

All i can say is that this sits up there as one of my all time fav fantasy series… (and I’ve read a heck of a lot of them)… so go buy them, go read them… don’t miss this.

(Parm)

 

Series
Greatcoats
1. Traitor’s Blade (2014)
2. Knight’s Shadow (2015)
3. Saint’s Blood (2016)
4. Tyrant’s Throne (2017)
thumbthumbthumbthumb
Spellslinger
1. Spellslinger (2017)
2. Shadowblack (2017)
thumbthumb

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Fantasy, Sebastien De Castell

C.F Iggulden : Darien: Empire of Salt (Review)

From acclaimed historical novelist Conn Iggulden, DARIEN is an epic new fantasy series of spellbinding imagination.

Author Bio

 

TWELVE FAMILIES. ONE THRONE. WELCOME TO THE EMPIRE OF SALT.

The city of Darien stands at the weary end of a golden age. Twelve families keep order with soldiers and artefacts, with spies and memories, maintaining a peace that shifts and crumbles constantly. The people of the city endure what they cannot change.

Here, amongst old feuds, a plot is hatched to kill a king. It will summon strangers to the city – Elias Post, a hunter; Tellius, an old swordsman banished from his home; Arthur, a boy who cannot speak; Daw Threefold, a chancer and gambler; Vic Deeds, who feels no guilt; and Nancy, a girl whose talent might be the undoing of them all.

Their presence inside the walls as the sun sets will set off a series of explosive events. Before the sun returns, six destinies will have been made – and lost – in Darien.

Review

I feel very fortunate to have been given the chance to read a very advance copy of this book. Conn Iggulden is one of the biggest names in Historical Fiction, i think still the only writer to top the Fiction and Non fiction charts at the same time. So when i found out that Conn Iggulden was going to do a fantasy book i was thrilled, the man is a born storyteller, given free reign to write without the bounds of history was going to be fun to read. Add to this the fact that he has a great passion for my favorite writer David Gemmell, which would without doubt and i think does influence his work, in the way he builds his characters and backgrounds, and the sparse style that says much with minimal words.

Given the above i’m sure you will not be expecting an impartial review? And yet it is,  i went into this book expecting a lot…. a heck of a lot, so failure to deliver would have meant a review to match.

What Conn Iggulden has produced is a book that will be in the running for the Fantasy book of the year, and if its not a shoe in for the Gemmell fantasy Debut next year im not sure what should be! (does it count as a debut if its first in Genre?)

With Darien, Conn has created a world with a hint of Dystopia, is this earth in some far flung future? or is it entirely a construct? that was always the puzzle and challenge with Gemmell. The City of Darien seems to have a very Roman flavour. The corruption, the absolute ruler, the advisory council, the legion. but its only a framework, everything as ever with Conn has so much more wrapped around that, and it all feels very fresh and original.

The Magic of the world is certainly fresh, light touch, some abilities, some items imbued with magic, many from a time past, in a society that has lost the knowledge of its glorious past. The Characters… well its an Iggulden book, the are multi faceted, easy to read and easy to love. The skills they bring, and talents to survive are subtle like so many of the plot twists and turns. You will be hooked before you know it.

This is a truly excellent book, I thought Mark Lawrence had a run away winner for Fantasy book of the year this year, but now we have Darien, and its going to make that choice very difficult.

Darien is one of the best fantasy titles you will read this year, and is another genre Conn Iggulden looks set to dominate.

(Parm)

 

Buy from Goldsboro 13th July 2017

Buy from Amazon 13th July 2017

Series
Emperor
1. The Gates of Rome (2002)
2. The Death of Kings (2004)
3. The Field of Swords (2004)
4. The Gods of War (2006)
5. The Blood of Gods (2013)
Gates of Rome / Death of Kings (omnibus) (2009)
Emperor (omnibus) (2011)
The Emperor Series Books 1-5 (omnibus) (2013)
thumbthumbthumbthumb
thumbthumbthumbthumb
Conqueror
1. Wolf of the Plains (2007)
aka Genghis: Birth of an Empire
2. Lords of the Bow (2008)
aka Genghis: Lords of the Bow
3. Bones of the Hills (2008)
4. Empire of Silver (2010)
aka Khan: Empire of Silver
5. Conqueror (2011)
Conqueror and Lords of the Bow (omnibus) (2009)
The Khan Series (omnibus) (2012)
Conqueror Series 5-Book Bundle (omnibus) (2013)
thumbthumbthumbthumb
thumbthumbthumb
Tollins
1. Tollins (2009)
2. Dynamite Tales (2011) (with Lizzy Duncan)
thumbthumb
Wars of the Roses
1. Stormbird (2013)
2. Trinity (2014)
aka Margaret of Anjou
3. Bloodline (2015)
4. Ravenspur (2016)
Wars of the Roses (omnibus) (2017)
thumbthumbthumbthumb
thumb
Novels
Dunstan (2017)
thumb
Novellas
Blackwater (2006)
Fig Tree (2014)
thumbthumb
Series contributed to
Quick Reads 2012
Quantum of Tweed (2012)
thumb
Non fiction
The Dangerous Book for Boys (2006) (with Hal Iggulden)
The Dangerous Book for Boys Yearbook (2007) (with Hal Iggulden)
The Pocket Dangerous Book for Boys: Things to Do (2007)(with Hal Iggulden)
The Dangerous Book for Boys Kit: How to Get There(2008)
The Dangerous Book for Boys Kit: Nature Fun (2008)
The Dangerous Book for Boys: 2009 Day-to-Day Calendar (2008)
The Pocket Dangerous Book for Boys: Facts, Figures and Fun (2008)
The Pocket Dangerous Book for Boys: Things to Know(2008) (with Hal Iggulden)
The Pocket Dangerous Book for Boys: Wonders of the World (2008) (with Hal Iggulden)
The Dangerous Book for Boys 2010 Day-to-Day Calendar (2009) (with Hal Iggulden)
The Dangerous Book of Heroes (2009) (with David Iggulden)
thumbthumbthumbthumb
thumbthumbthumbthumb
thumbthumbthumb

2 Comments

Filed under C.F Iggulden

Peter Newman: The Seven (Vagrant book 3) Review/Blog Tour

Peter Newman

Peter Newman's picture

Peter Newman co-writes the Hugo nominated Tea and Jeopardy podcast and is also the voice of the butler, Latimer.

***DO NOT READ THE BELOW IF YOU HAVE NOT READ THE MALICE***

***DO NOT READ THE BELOW IF YOU HAVE NOT READ THE MALICE***

Years have passed since the Vagrant journeyed to the Shining City, Vesper in arm and Gamma’s sword in hand.

Since then the world has changed. Vesper, following the footsteps of her father, journeyed to the breach and closed the tear between worlds, protecting the last of humanity, but also trapping the infernal horde and all those that fell to its corruptions: willing or otherwise.

In this new age it is Vesper who leads the charge towards unity and peace, with seemingly nothing standing between the world and a bright new future.

That is until eyes open.

And The Seven awaken

Review

I find that Peter Newman breaks the mould a bit with this series, as he makes me break my reading rules. He somehow convinced me to read Malice before Vagrant…. i know shocking! Yet i found the book could indeed be read as a stand alone. I’m not sure i feel that The Seven could be, there is too much you need to know from before to invest you in the book/ series to just take a dive into this book. I’m also not sure where i would truly pigeon hole this book genre wise… is it really Fantasy? or Dystopian? or Scifi? (i hate Scifi) or just a blend of all?

As with the previous two books, the story is quite dark, gritty and immersive. Its not a book i can read in my normal style of pick up and put down, it needs to be read in large swathes of reading time to truly enter the world and the spirit of the story. I find for me at times it (like Malice) can be a little too dark and a smidgen too depressing…but that said i think its a testament to the writing that it elicits a range of emotions across the spectrum and makes me want to keep reading. It has that ability to give you edge of the seat tension as well as doldrum like darkness and all the time keeping you in step with the wonderful characters of the book.

In my last review i wrote : “The major characters don’t require major depth, in fact they seem to start out shells ready to be filled, and grow as the book progresses, as do the variations of creatures that now inhabit the world.”

Over the course of Malice, Vagrant and the City and now the Seven, Peter Newman has more than filled the shells of these characters, his world has blossomed from its dark beginnings giving the reader such a rich kaleidoscope for the imagination and a truly original tale that i dare any reader to not enjoy and not be utterly drawn in by his world and the people who inhabit it.

(Parm)

Series
Vagrant
1. The Vagrant (2015)
2. The Malice (2016)
3. The Seven (2017)
The Hammer and the Goat (2016)
The Vagrant and the City (2017)
thumbthumbthumbthumb
thumb
Tales Of Albion
1. Landfall (2016)
thumb

1 Comment

Filed under Fantasy, Peter Newman

James Jackson: Treason (Review)

James H Jackson's picture

James H Jackson UK flag (1962 – )

Born in London in 1962. Educated at Cheam School, Wellington College, Bristol University, King’s College London, the London College of Law, and the Inns of Court School of Law. Called to the Bar and is a Member of the Inner Temple.

book cover of 

Treason

Behind the famous rhyme lies a murderous conspiracy that goes far beyond Guy Fawkes and his ill-fated Gunpowder Plot . . .

In a desperate race against time, spy Christian Hardy must uncover a web of deceit that runs from the cock-fighting pits of Shoe Lane, to the tunnels beneath a bear-baiting arena in Southwark, and from the bad lands of Clerkenwell to a brutal firefight in The Globe theatre.

But of the forces ranged against Hardy, all pale beside the renegade Spanish agent codenamed Realm.

Review

This is an excellent, hard and uncompromising novel, Taking the reader through the dark murky world of espionage in England in the early 1600’s. The brutality of the clash of protestant and catholic worlds, all narrowed down to a single plot, an attempted act of terrorism that still resounds through the country today such was its audacity.

James Jackson takes very little mercy on the reader, providing a view of London and wider England in all its filth, muck and mire, with betrayals, backstabbing, murder and mayhem. This is not a gentle time in this lands history and it is right it should be shown warts and all. When the author couples that with a twisting winding plot and disparate hunters many of which controlled by the spider at the center of the web of intrigue Robert Cecil you get a book that grabs you and doesn’t let go until the final page.

A very interesting and very powerful book, highly recommended

(Parm)

Novels

Dead Headers (1997)
Cold Cut (1999)
The Reaper (2001)
Blood Rock (2007)
Pilgrim (2008)
Realm (2010)
Hllenfeuer (2011)
Perdition (2012)
Endkampf (2013)
The Race (2013)
Treason (2016)
thumbthumbthumbthumb
thumbthumbthumbthumb
thumbthumbthumb
Non fiction
The Counter-Terrorist Handbook (2005)
thumb

Leave a comment

Filed under James Jackson