Tag Archives: Fiction

James Rollins: Eye of God (Review)

Author

rollins

James Rollins was born in Chicago, Illinois, is 1961. With his three brothers and three sisters, he was raised in the Midwest and rural Canada. He graduated with a doctorate in veterinary medicine from the University of Missouri and went on to establish his own veterinary practice in Sacramento, California. An amateur spelunker and a PADI-certified scuba enthusiast, he’ll often be found either underground or underwater.

Product details

EOG

  • Hardcover: 432 pages
  • Publisher: Orion (18 July 2013)
  • Language: Unknown
  • ISBN-10: 1409113906
  • ISBN-13: 978-1409113904
  • Product Dimensions: 23.9 x 15.9 x 3.8 cm

Buy the book from Amazon

In The Eye of God, a Sigma Force novel, New York Times best-selling author James Rollins delivers an apocalyptic vision of a future predicted by the distant past.

In the wilds of Mongolia, a research satellite has crashed, triggering an explosive search for its valuable cargo: a code-black physics project connected to the study of dark energy – and a shocking image of the eastern seaboard of the United States in utter ruin.

At the Vatican, a package arrives containing two strange artefacts: a skull scrawled with ancient Aramaic and a tome bound in human skin. DNA evidence reveals that both came from the same body: the long dead Mongol king Genghis Khan.

Commander Gray Pierce and Sigma Force set out to discover a truth tied to the fall of the Roman Empire, to a mystery going back to the birth of Christianity, and to a weapon hidden for centuries that holds the fate of humanity.

Review:

James Rollins is the Thriller writer all thriller fans should read IMHO, all the hype that exists around Dan Brown seems even more unwarranted when you read the quality of story plot, pace, action and adventure that he publishes year in year out. Some of the earlier novels (listed below under Novels) can to some go to the extreme of credulity, but they are still so well written and so much fun they are addictive.

The Sigma series are that well written, but instead of stretching credulity they inspire, they give a view of technology to aspire to. So many people look at books like this and think “far fetched” when an author pushes the boundaries of technology and fiction it needs to be done right and Rollins always does this with style, look at early star trek, some of the idea (like personal communicators)  came to pass (Mobile phones). Look at advances in Rollins books like Monks prosthetic hand, and do an on-line search of the next gen prosthetics, Monks hand has been around for a few years now, the idea behind it so deep so detailed, and this is just one of the ideas brought forth by Rollins wonderful imagination, this imagination is so real so detailed, from the overall plot down to the nitty gritty fine details.

In this latest book Rollins takes us on a journey through history and through the future of Space, time and dark matter. The concepts and the research for this book must have absorbed him for months. The introduction of some of the Greatest/ darkest men in History was wonderful, Genghis and Attila combined with St Thomas. How does an imagination come up with a plot like that astounds me. Add in the fine detail of families, loves won, loves lost and some very brave writing by the author. This is probably the richest and most elaborate, and at the same time down to earth and emotive of all the sigma books.

Very Highly recommended

(Parm)

Other books by this author

Series
Sigma Force
1. Sandstorm (2004)
2. Map of Bones (2005)
3. Black Order (2006)
4. The Judas Strain (2007)
5. The Last Oracle (2008)
6. The Doomsday Key (2009)
7. The Devil Colony (2011)
8. Bloodline (2012)
9. The Eye of God (2013)
The Skeleton Key (2011)
The Doomsday Key / The Last Oracle (omnibus) (2011)
SandstormMap of BonesBlack OrderThe Judas Strain
The Last OracleThe Doomsday KeyThe Devil ColonyBloodline
The Eye of GodThe Skeleton KeyThe Doomsday Key / The Last Oracle
Jake Ransom
1. Jake Ransom and the Skull King’s Shadow (2009)
2. Jake Ransom and the Howling Sphinx (2011)
Jake Ransom and the Skull King's ShadowJake Ransom and the Howling Sphinx
Order of the Sanguines (with Rebecca Cantrell)
1. The Blood Gospel
2. City of Screams
3. Innocent Blood
The Blood GospelCity of Screams
Tucker Wayne (with Grant Blackwood)
1. The Kill Switch (2014)
Novels
Subterranean (1999)
Excavation (2000)
Deep Fathom (2001)
Amazonia (2002)
Ice Hunt (2003)
Altar of Eden (2009)
SubterraneanExcavationDeep FathomAmazonia
Ice HuntAltar of Eden
Novellas
Tracker (2012)
Tracker
Series contributed to
Indiana Jones (Films)
4. Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull (2008)
Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull

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Filed under Action/ Adventure Thrillers, Crime, Thrillers

Paul Fraser Collard: The Scarlet Thief

Who is Paul Fraser Collard

collard

My love of history started in my childhood. As a child of the seventies I was brought up on a diet of Warlord and Commando comics whilst watching films like A Bridge too FarThe Longest Day and Zulu. At that time it was natural to play soldiers, either running around with my friends using nothing more dangerous than an armed finger, or playing with hundreds of small plastic men who had been fixed into a thousand different martial poses, all to inspire me to recreate the battles that I watched on TV.

As I got older I discovered the novels by Bernard Cornwell and I still remember the delight of reading Sharpe’s Enemy for the very first time (it is still my favourite novel to this day). That Christmas my parents bought me the entire backlist of Sharpe novels and they still sit in pride of place on my bookshelves although their covers show the battering of being read and reread over the years.

At no time did I ever consider writing myself. At school my love of all things military led me to apply for an Army Sixth Form Scholarship, an award that would lead to a place at Sandhurst, and, with luck and a vast amount of hard work and determination, a commission as an officer in the British army.

But when I came to leave school my mind changed. I had met my future wife and suddenly the draw of being an officer paled against the attraction of making a life with the woman I loved. So I left my childhood dream behind and embarked on a career in the City of London, a choice of job, that back then, did not carry the same stigma that it has acquired over the last few years.

All went well and I still work in the City today. I have learnt much over the years and without a shred of doubt I have been lucky to survive so long. I have also been fortunate to work with the same wonderful team for the last fifteen years which has made the daily grind so much more enjoyable than it should be.

It was only as I turned thirty that I started to consider writing for the first time. By then I had been commuting into London for years and the long train journey had been spent reading everything from Flashman to legal thrillers from the likes of Mark Gimenez and John Grisham.

I never thought of training myself to write. I just did it, bashing out a book without a single iota of planning. Since then I have written pretty much every day, never once stopping to analyse what I am doing, or how I am doing it. I just go for it.

I write what I like, about a subject that I am passionate about and which still interests me no matter how much I read and research the period. It would be easy to read the brilliant stories already set in the period and be deterred from daring to tread on the same turf but at the end of the day I cannot be swayed from the period that interests me the most. I simply do the best I can.

Paul Fraser Collard  – Sunday 11th November 2012

The Scarlet Thief:

scarlet

BRIEF DESCRIPTION 1854: The banks of the Alma River, Crimean Peninsular. The Redcoats stagger to a bloody halt. The men of the King’s Royal Fusiliers are in terrible trouble, ducking and twisting as the storm of shot, shell and bullet tear through their ranks. Officer Jack Lark has to act immediately and decisively. His life and the success of the campaign depend on it. But does he have the mettle, the officer qualities that are the life blood of the British Army? From a poor background Lark has risen through the ranks by stealth and guile and now he faces the ultimate test… THE SCARLET THIEF introduces us to a formidable and compelling hero – brutally courageous, roguish, ambitious – in a historical novel as robust as it is thrillingly authentic by an author who brings history and battle vividly alive.

 

Review

Paul Collard in the form of Jack Lark provide the reader with a new man, not a hero, but a man flawed and heroic, a product of his environment, but with a desire to pull himself away from the squalor that is the lot of the poor man in the 1850’s.

His story has flashes of the writing that gave Bernard Cornwell his man Sharpe, but it is also more, There is no pretence to the man which is funny given that his entire career as a Captain is a pretence. He is who he is, even hiding as a Captain the man will out, his colourful language, his ability to think for himself, to act, to think of the men under him and the way they are treated, so many things that would and do set him as a Captain apart. There is a different camaraderie in the book coupled with a small level of romance that were flashes of John Wilcox and his Simon Fonthill series, the interplay between batman and officer.

I’m no expert on the period so cannot say if the history is accurately depicted, but it felt accurate, it felt real, it felt alive.

The story its self contains some of the most riveting battle scenes I have read ever, every line every paragraph and page of the battles had me hooked, riveted to the page, there were times when I was almost as breathless as the exhausted soldiers. Paul Collard put the reader through the mill (almost as much as the soldiers). Death is on a huge scale, but not gratuitous, it merely shows the reader the hell of the battles in the Crimea, and the worthlessness of having a command built on privilege rather than skill, and even the skilled can break in the teeth of the utter horror that is war. It also shows that the writer is not afraid to kill off what would be key characters for other authors.

I really like reading debut books, to see who are the starts of the future, and Paul Collard is most certainly one. Book two cannot come soon enough for me

Hardback (9th May 2013)   http://www.amazon.co.uk/Scarlet-Thief-Jack-Lark/dp/1472200233/ref=sr_1_2_title_1_har?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1365002655&sr=1-2

Paper Back (21st Nov 2013) http://www.amazon.co.uk/Scarlet-Thief-Paul-Fraser-Collard/dp/1472200268/ref=tmm_pap_title_0?ie=UTF8&qid=1365002655&sr=1-2

Kindle: (9th May 2013) http://www.amazon.co.uk/Scarlet-Thief-Jack-Lark-ebook/dp/B00ABLJ5LS/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1365002742&sr=1-1

Book 2 The Maharajah’s General is due 21st November 2013 http://www.amazon.co.uk/Maharajahs-General-Paul-Fraser-Collard/dp/1472200276/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1365002863&sr=1-1

Jack Lark barely survived the Battle of the Alma in Crimea, and his future seemed bleak. But now he’s found a way to get back to war, masquerading as a captain who died of his wounds. Arriving in India, Jack finds new enemies to fight, but this time they’re on his own side. Unmasked as a fraud, he escapes with the chaplain’s daughter, and in desperation, they seek refuge with the Maharajah the British Army is trying to defeat. The Maharajah sees Jack as a curiosity, but recognises a fellow military mind. In return for his safety, Jack must train the very army he came to India to fight. And one day soon, the two sides must meet in battle…

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Twelve Children of Paris by Tim Willocks

About Tim Willocks

Tim Willocks

Writer Tim Willocks is a successful novelist and screenwriter. A qualified doctor and psychiatrist, he published his first novel, Bad City Blues, in 1991, followed by Green River Rising in 1994 and Bloodstained Kings in 1995. He co-wrote Sweet Angel Mine, adapted Bad City Blues for the screen in 1999, wrote the Steven Spielberg documentary The Unfinished Journey, and currently has a script in production called Sin.

The Twelve Children of Paris (2013)
(The second book in the Tannhauser Trilogy series)

Product details
Hardcover: 768 pages
Publisher: Jonathan Cape (23 May 2013)
ISBN-10: 0224097458
ISBN-13: 978-0224097451

12 children

Paris, August 23rd, 1572.

What do you do when your wife disappears.

In the middle of the bloodiest massacre in European history.

And you know she is about to give birth to your only child?

Three wars of religion have turned Paris into a foetid cauldron of hatred, intrigue and corruption. The Royal Wedding, intended to heal the wounds, has served only to further poison the fanatics of either creed. But Carla could not have known that when she accepted an invitation to the ceremony.

When Mattias Tannhauser rides into town, on Saint Bartholomew’s Eve, his only intention is to find her and take her home. But as the massacre of tens of thousands of Huguenots begins, and the city plunges into anarchy, Carla is abducted by Grymonde, the grotesque gang leader of the Yards, and Tannhauser finds himself imprisoned in the Louvre, at the centre of a vicious conspiracy.

Wanted by the law, the assassins’ guild, and a militant army who call themselves the Pilgrims of Saint-Jacques, Tannhauser must rise to pitiless extremes even he has never known before. With no one to help him but a stable boy, he wades a river of blood without knowing what lies on the other side.

As he harrows Hell in search of his beloved

His destiny is changed forever by

The Twelve Children Of Paris.

Review

When I first heard about this book, the first thing I did was email and ask for a review copy, by ask I mean beg. Apparently after taking pity on me for my pitiful email or just to stop me emailing any-more Tim’s publicist sent me a copy.
There are two reasons I wanted to read this book so badly.
1) This book while in my favourite genre, takes me well outside my comfort zone. It is so much more visually detailed that my usual read.
2) Tim Willocks last book Religion was so good and so long ago (7 years)

To say that reading this book gives the reader the sights sounds smells and feel of the time period would be far to demeaning, it really is so much more, Its a time machine back to 1572. To the real Paris, full of opulence and coated in shit.
What is so unexpected is the lead man of the book (I say lead, not Hero, there is no real Hero in this book). The story follows the exploits of one Mattias Tannhauser, a Saxon-born ex-Janissary who travels to Paris to find his wife. A long journey that should have ended with a happy reunion in the palaces of Paris, is disrupted by a violent plot to wipe out The Huguenots (members of the Protestant Reformed Church of France)…and something more personal!
The story has more than the single POV, while Mattias Tannhauser’s journey through Paris is one of the bloodiest swathes I have ever read, Carla Tannhauser’s is at first similar, but as the victim, and then turns more towards the emotive and spiritual. The spiritual exploring everything from Catholic thinking through to Tarot and Gia the earth mother, the sisterhood of women.

IMG_1561

The above is the promo cover, and for me its a big buy in. I love something as blunt as that.

What I would disagree with is the headcount, Mattias kills ….so many more people that the cover suggests and in probably more varied ways than suggested. Its not that he is a psycho killer. Its that he is a lion among sheep, he has been trained in war, he has survived the biggest battle of his age (the siege of Malta, a bloody turning point in the fabric of Europe that halted the march of Islam), in fighting terms he is a man among children. There are a few points when it seems a bit beyond the pale, but when you compare his skills to the political and Militia appointed soldiers of Paris, you can clearly see this man achieving everything he set out to, bathing in blood and gore from one side of Paris to the other (and back again)
But this journey of Mattias is not just a bloody trip through 1572 Paris, its also a journey to further self enlightenment, and to finding and building a new family. Carla his wife is not just in danger, she is Pregnant and both she and Mattias will journey through hell and wade through rivers of blood to ensure the child’s safety.
Along the way 11 other children touch their lives, and save their souls. But even with all of this neither of them are my favourite character, that was Grymonde “The Infant”, a hugely simple yet complex character. A man warped by life, by Paris and by disease. Willing to commit all and win or lose all on the single throw of a dice. His cry “No tomorrow” sums up his view that the poor of Paris cannot plan a life, because they don’t know where their next meal will come from, they have no clean water, the streets are filled with shit and the price of life is less than a loaf of bread. Grymonde is death on legs, with no conscience, until he meets Carla. The author could so easily have taken the easy way out and set Grymonde and Mattias against each other, but he plays them so much better than that, or rather Carla does.

Twelve Children of Paris is a power House of thrilling historical fiction. Jam packed with the most realistic fighting this side of a Christian Cameron book. I’m not sure I can recommend this book highly enough, go buy it…now!

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Twelve-Children-Paris-Tim-Willocks/dp/0224097458/ref=la_B000AQ8QVY_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1364227011&sr=1-1

and before you ask…no you don’t have to have read Religion, but what ever order you read them in read both amazing tomes.

(Parm)

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Giles Kristian: Brothers’ Fury

Author: Giles Kristian

GK-long

Giles has led a varied life to say the least. During the 90s he was lead singer of pop group Upside Down, achieving four top twenty hit records, performing twice on Top of the Pops, and singing at such venues as the Royal Albert Hall, N.E.C. and Wembley Arena.

giles 2

As a singer songwriter he lived and toured for two years in Europe and has made music videos all over the world, from Prague, Miami, Mexico, and the Swiss Alps, to Bognor Regis! To fund his writing habit he has worked as a model, appearing in TV commercials and ads for the likes of Walls Ice Cream (he was the Magnum Man) Canon cameras and two brands of lager! He has been an advertising copywriter and lived for two and a half years in New York where he wrote copy for movie marketing company Empire Design but mainly worked on his first novel.

Family history and his storytelling hero, Bernard Cornwell, inspired GILES KRISTIAN to begin writing his action-packed Viking series. The first book, Raven: Blood Eye, was published to great acclaim and two further highly praised novels, Sons of Thunder and Odin’s Wolves, complete the bestselling trilogy.

Giles’ fascination with the English Civil War began at school, where he appreciated the cold efficiency of Cromwell’s New Model Army but also revelled in the flamboyance of the Cavaliers and the romance of the doomed Royalist cause. It is this complex and brutal conflict that provides the backcloth to his new historical series, The Bleeding Land.

He lives in Leicestershire.

Author Web Site: http://www.gileskristian.com/

Author Raven Video: http://youtu.be/VSMV4GjzYRE

Bleeding Land Video: http://youtu.be/AFIxzqHVATA

Book Description

Fury

Following in the footsteps of Bernard Cornwell, Giles Kristian continues his thrilling and acclaimed story of the Rivers family, whose lives are turned upside down by that most brutal and tragic of wars — the English Civil War.
Rebel: Cast out from his home, rejected by his family, Tom Rivers returns to his regiment. But his former commander believes the young hothead”s recklessness and contempt for authority has no place in his troop. And yet to a spymaster like Captain Crafte, Tom”s dark and fearless nature is in itself a weapon to be turned upon the hated Cavaliers. For who else would dare to infiltrate Oxford, now the Royalist capital, to destroy the King”s printing press and strike a blow at the very heart of the enemy?

Renegade: Raw with grief at the death of his father, Edmund Rivers rejects the peace talks between Parliament and the King. Instead, he leads a ragged but hardened band of marauders across the moors, appearing out of the frozen world to fall on unsuspecting rebel columns like wolves. But Prince Rupert, who recognises in Mun a fellow child of war, has other uses for him, from stealing an enormous gun, to burrowing through mud beneath the walls of Lichfield. The only peace the enemy will get from Mun Rivers is that of the grave.

Huntress: Her heart broken from the loss of her beloved Emmanuel and her father, Bess Rivers must make the hardest decision of her life. Leaving her new-born son behind she rides from Sheer House seeking Lady Mary”s estranged father, for she hopes he will help her re-unite what is left of her broken family. Risking her own life on the road, Bess will do whatever it takes to find her brother Tom and secure his Royal pardon — can she douse the flames of her brother’s’ fury and see them reconciled?

Review

Before I start on the book a small note about the author: Giles is one of the truly nicest most genuine people I have met, not just in the world of writers but just in life.

I feel that this genuine real personality is something that influences his writing. Don’t get me wrong his books are not nice guy books, they are not judgemental, they don’t push an agenda. You get a story (or in the case of the Raven, a saga). The characters are real people, real people set in the past, living a real existence that is accurate to the period.

In book one; The Bleeding Land, we met the Rivers family and experienced the pain and suffering, the love and the adventures that all members of the family endured. https://parmenionbooks.wordpress.com/wp-admin/post.php?post=6&action=edit

Brothers Fury (bk 2) picks up not long after the end of book 1. We see and experience how the brothers Mun and Tom have changed, how the war has changed them both, how the spectre of death has shaped them

What a cruel thing is war: to separate and destroy families and friends, and mar
the purest joys and happiness God has granted us in this world; to fill our
hearts with hatred instead of love for our neighbors, and to devastate the fair
face of this beautiful world. ~Robert E. Lee

The English Civil war has torn a country, families, neighbours communities asunder.  The Rivers family are all changed by this war. Both Mun and Tom are now killers, not born but made by the hell of civil war.

While clinging to the sanity of family and trying to pull her beloved brothers back from the brink of chaos is Bess Rivers. She is scouring the country with her protectors looking for Tom, certain that finding him and talking to him will be enough to put out the fires of his fury and the pain of his loss.

Giles characters are so real it can be quite scary at times. I can relate to Mun in particular, his desire to do the right thing, to live and if need be die for his honour and his family, whilst controlling the killer he has within. While the brothers are on opposite sides of the war they share the same traits of fearless fighters, but where Mun is a controlled killer of men, Tom is almost swamped by his rage in battle a baresark warrior,, a man who gives himself over to the rage and black fog of war.

It’s this realistic characterisation that makes this such a special book. Giles is exceptional at his historical research down to the geek level of the right uniform, weapons, even the buttons and material. But the people are so real so life-like you can relate to every emotion. The setting of a portion of the book in Oxford, my birthplace and a wonderful historic place to grow up was just the icing on the cake. Roll all of that into a story told in such a flowing compelling style and Brother Fury will be one of the finest books you read this year, and is a tale you can re-read many times as years go by. It has all the quality of a timeless classic of the genre.

My Highest recommendation

(Parm)

Other Books by Giles:

Raven
Blood Eye
Sons of Thunder
Odin's Wolves

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M C Scott : Rome the Art of War

Author

Manda

M C Scott A pseudonym used by Manda Scott

MC Scott…. qualified as a veterinary surgeon from Glasgow University and spent fifteen years in Newmarket and Cambridge specialising in anaesthesia and intensive care, before turning to writing as an alternative, less sleep-deprived, profession.M.C.

Of the novels so far published, the first four were contemporary crime thrillers. The first, ‘Hen’s Teeth’ was short listed for the Orange prize in 1997; the third, ‘Stronger than Death’ was awarded an Arts Council of England prize for Literature and the fourth, ‘No Good Deed’, was nominated in the ‘Best Crime Novel’ category of the prestigious US Edgar Awards in 2003.

Scott runs shamanic dreaming workshops which teach the basis of the dreaming described in the Boudica series.

art of war

Product Description

Rome: AD69, The Year of the Four Emperors.Three Emperors have ruled in Rome this year and a fourth, Vespasian, has been named in the East.

As the legions march toward civil war, Sebastos Pantera, the spy whose name means leopard, returns to Rome intent on bribery, blackmail and persuasion: whatever it takes to bring the commanders and their men to Vespasian’s side.

But in Rome, as he uses every skill he has ever learned of subterfuge, codes and camouflage, it becomes clear that one of those closest to him is a traitor, who will let Rome fall to destroy him.

Together the two spies spin a web of deceit with Rome as the prize and death the only escape.

Review

After Eagle of the Twelfth i thought Manda had hit the peak of her writing, the story was one of the finest books of 2012 https://parmenionbooks.wordpress.com/2012/05/30/m-c-scott-the-eagle-of-the-twelfth-qa/

That book had it all, every facet of a great story existed, a truly action packed emotional ride from start to finish.

Rome Art of War manages to go one better, combining all the aspect of the last book but wrapping it with a level of skill and intrigue that is just dazzling. The key protagonist Pantera is amazingly viewed from all the other key perspectives in the book, giving a highly interesting and engaging view of the over all story. When that is coupled with Manda’s impeccable historical research, knowledge and (not widely known) background in crime thriller fiction a whole new edge is opened to your Historical Fiction reading. I don’t read many complex crime/ spy fiction books set in the past, if they were all written this well it’s all I would read.

I’m going to stop saying “this is the best book this year” because there are now officially too many fantastic books out already this year. What I will say is that you MUST buy this book. If you love crime, historical fiction, books full of action and intrigue and if you want to learn how to write a book that is the pinnacle in multi faceted writing style, then this is the book you must have.

My Highest recommendation

(Parm)

Other Books

Rome
1. The Emperor’s Spy (2009)
aka The Fire of Rome
2. The Coming of the King (2011)
3. The Eagle Of The Twelfth (2012)
4. The Art of War (2013)

The Emperor's SpyThe Coming of the KingThe Eagle Of The TwelfthThe Art of War

Grave Gold / Dream Walker / Pantera II (2011)
Grave Gold / Dream Walker / Pantera II
Novellas
The Last Roman in Britan (2011)
Raven Feeder (2011)
The Last Roman in BritanRaven Feeder
Kellen Stewart Series
1. Hen’s Teeth (1997)
2. Night Mares (1998)
3. Stronger Than Death (1999)
Hen's TeethNight MaresStronger Than Death
Boudica
1. Dreaming the Eagle (2003)
2. Dreaming the Bull (2004)
3. Dreaming the Hound (2005)
4. Dreaming the Serpent Spear (2006)
Dreaming the EagleDreaming the BullDreaming the HoundDreaming the Serpent Spear

No Good Deed (2001)

Absolution (2005)

The Crystal Skull (2008)      aka 2012: The Crystal Skull

No Good DeedThe Crystal Skull

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Christian Cameron: Poseidon’s Spear Review

Christian Cameron

Christian Cameron was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania in 1962. He grew up in Rockport, Massachusetts, Iowa City, Iowa, and Rochester, New York, where he attended McQuaid Jesuit High School and later graduated from the University of Rochester with a degree in history.

After the longest undergraduate degree on record (1980-87), he joined the United States Navy, where he served as an intelligence officer and as a backseater in S-3 Vikings in the First Gulf War, in Somalia, and elsewhere. After a dozen years of service, he became a full time writer in 2000. He lives in Toronto (that’s Ontario, in Canada) with his wife Sarah and their daughter Beatrice, currently age seven. He attends the University of Toronto when the gods move him and may eventually have a Masters in Classics, but right now he’s a full time historical novelist, and it is the best job in the world.

Christian is a dedicated reenactor and you can follow some of his recreated projects on the Online Agora. He’s always recruiting, so if you’d like to try the ancient world, the medieval world, or the late 18th century, follow the links to Contact Him

Book Description

Arimnestos of Plataea is a man who has seen and done things that most men only dream about. Sold into slavery as a boy, he fought his way to freedom – and then to everlasting fame at the Battle of Marathon where the Greeks crushed the invading Persians. Sometimes, however, a man’s greatest triumph is followed by his greatest sorrow.Returning to his farm, Arimnestos finds that his wife Euphoria has died in childbirth, and in an instant his laurels turn to dust. But the gods are not finished with Arimnestos yet. With nothing left to live for, he throws himself from a cliff into the sea, only to be pulled by strong arms from death’s embrace. When he awakes he finds himself chained to an oar in a Phoenician trireme. And so begins an epic journey that will take Arimnestos and a motley crew of fellow galley slaves to the limits of their courage and beyond the edge of the known world, in a quest for freedom, revenge – and a cargo so precious it is worth dying for.

Review

As a self-confessed addict of Christian Cameron’s books I start to worry about the veracity of my reviews and opinions when a new book is due out, but as ever I will attempt, poorly, to describe his latest book.

Poseidon’s Spear is not your normal historical fiction title (but none of his books are) this book goes even further. You don’t get the steady build to a final battle, you don’t even get a final battle. You dont get the standard flawed man does good. You dont get hero and sidekick. You get something much more real, what you get is one persons personal journey through life, and in the case of Poseidon’s Spear though hell and back.

Poseidon’s Spear is one mans personal journey through a very dark period in his life. His battle against odds that would kill many a person, a journey through the bowels of the ancient world. A view of the depravity that men could inflict on other men in the ancient world (and lets face it still do).

We see this man, Arimnestos’s journey back, we see what true friends are worth and how rich a man truly is with real friends.

We see a man who has regrets and deals with them the same as each and every one of us does.

We see the Resurrection of Arimnestos of Plataea.

I have said since it came out that God of War was the book of the year 2012. I have now been proved a liar.

Poseidon’s Spear has now taken its place. I’m not a person to live the emotions of a book, I would normally read and enjoy the plot and style, but its impossible not to get sucked into the emotion of this book as well, to not to have to fight back the tears with Arimnestos, not to feel his pain to suffer along side him.

This was by far the most exhausting exhilarating book I have ever read physically and emotionally.

My highest Recommendation

(Parm)

Due out on Sept 13th 2012
amazon.co.uk

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