Fall of Dragons Publication Day

With Pen and Sword

The Fall of Dragons Cover

It’s launch day, at least in the UK.

I started writing these novels in 2012.  I think there’s at least 2400 pages of material, and I could write more.  It’s odd to say goodbye.

However, I want to take this space to discuss origins and books I loved, not endings.  Who knows, maybe Gollanz will eventually want more.  I certainly hope so… a great deal of effort went into world development, both thirty years ago and right up until a few days ago… but that’s another story.

Today’s story is the origins story, with a few tiny spoilers. Really, it’s a social history, or an historiography, with lots of thanks.

Alba started as an RPG.  There were between nine and twenty players, and we always had a heavy element of war gaming involved, so there was an RPG level, a political level, and a military level, and the three were…

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James Rollins : Demon Crown (Review)

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Author Web site

James Rollins is a #1 New York Times bestselling author of international thrillers, translated into more than forty languages. His Sigma series has been lauded as one of the “top crowd pleasers” (New York Times) and one of the “hottest summer reads” (People Magazine). In each novel, acclaimed for its originality, Rollins unveils unseen worlds, scientific breakthroughs, and historical secrets–and he does it all at breakneck speed and with stunning insight.

As a boy immersed in the scientific adventures of Doc Savage, the wonders of Jules Verne and H.G. Wells, and pulps such as The Shadow, The Spider, and The Avenger, James Rollins decided he wanted to be a writer. He honed his storytelling skills early, spinning elaborate tales that were often at the heart of pranks played on his brothers and sisters.

Before he would set heroes and villains on harrowing adventures, Rollins embarked on a career in veterinary medicine, graduating from the University of Missouri and establishing a successful veterinary practice. He continues to volunteer his time and veterinary skills in support of the local SPCA. His hands-on knowledge of medicine and science helps shape the research and scientific speculation that set James Rollins books apart.

 

The Demon Crown (2017)
(Book 13 in the Sigma Force series)

book cover of The Demon Crown

THE DEMON CROWN

Off the coast of Brazil, a team of scientists discovers a horror like no other, an island where all life has been eradicated, consumed and possessed by a species beyond imagination. Before they can report their discovery, a mysterious agency attacks the group, killing them all, save one, an entomologist, an expert on venomous creatures, Professor Ken Matsui from Cornell University.

Strangest of all, this inexplicable threat traces back to a terrifying secret buried a century ago beneath the National Mall: a cache of bones preserved in amber. The artifact was hidden away by a cabal of scientists – led by Alexander Graham Bell – to protect humankind. But they dared not destroy it, for the object also holds an astonishing promise for the future: the very secret of life after death.

Yet, nothing stays buried forever. An ancient horror – dormant in the marrow of those preserved bones – is free once more, nursed and developed into a weapon of incalculable strength and malignancy, ready to wreak havoc on an unsuspecting world.

To stop its spread, Commander Grayson Pierce of Sigma Force must survive a direct attack on the island of Maui. To be there first has always been the core mission of Sigma Force, a covert team forged to be America’s front line against emerging threats. But this time, even Sigma may not be able to decipher this deadly mystery, one that traces back to the founding of the Smithsonian Institution.

With each new discovery, the menace they hunt is changing, growing, spreading – adapting and surviving every attempt to stop it from reconquering a world it once ruled. And each transformation makes it stronger . . . and smarter.

Running out of time and options, Commander Grayson Pierce will be forced to make an impossible choice. To eradicate this extinction-level threat and expose those involved, he will have to join forces with Sigma’s greatest enemy–the newly resurrected Guild – even it if means sacrificing one of his own.

Review

Thirteen books into the Sigma series and as a reader i always worry how a writer will keep a series fresh, new and exciting and with this type of book where cutting edge is key can they keep it in the realm of believable.

James Rollins always amazes me with his ability to write a tight, interesting, action packed story, but most of all his ability to keep coming up with world ending scenarios that are totally realistic. Each and everyone a trial for the Sigma team, to both solve the world ending conundrum and also survive those who are trying to cause the apocalypse.

With a Rollins book its not just the roller coaster ride of the thriller that wins me over, its the absolute attention to detail, the huge depth of subject research, both biological and historical, but also arms and armour. These are not cheaply thrown together beach pulp fiction titles, these are the cream of the Action Adventure, thriller world, and year after year book after book he manages to knock it out of the park.

Demon Crown is quite possibly one of the best to come out of the Sigma Force stable. Infusing history across multiple time periods for both the cataclysmic event, but also the conspiracy that surrounds the Guild, the latest potential technology for DARPA and similar agencies, a new and ancient, deadly, potentially global event, so simple and yet so complex in its devising that it kept me guessing all the way through the book, set in locations so well described you want to pack your bags and visit. As always the whole thing pulled together by characters who while on the heroic side, they also live  , breathe and bleed on every page, making the whole book believable.

A full five stars again for this splendid book, just what i hoped for and always more than i expected.

(Parm)

 

Series
Sigma Force
1. Sandstorm (2004)
2. Map of Bones (2005)
3. Black Order (2006)
4. The Judas Strain (2007)
5. The Last Oracle (2008)
6. The Doomsday Key (2009)
6.5. The Skeleton Key (2011)
7. The Devil Colony (2011)
7.5. Tracker (2012)
8. Bloodline (2012)
9. The Eye of God (2013)
10. The Sixth Extinction (2014)
10.5. The Midnight Watch (2015)
11. The Bone Labyrinth (2015)
12. The Seventh Plague (2016)
13. The Demon Crown (2017)
The Doomsday Key / The Last Oracle (omnibus) (2013)
Sigma Force Novels 1 (omnibus) (2014)
Crash and Burn (2016)
Ghost Ship (2017)
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Jake Ransom
1. Jake Ransom and the Skull King’s Shadow (2009)
2. Jake Ransom and the Howling Sphinx (2010)
Jake Ransom Complete Collection (omnibus) (2014)
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Order of the Sanguines (with Rebecca Cantrell)
0.5. City of Screams (2012)
1. The Blood Gospel (2013)
1.5. Blood Brothers (2013)
2. Innocent Blood (2013)
3. Blood Infernal (2014)
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Tucker Wayne (with Grant Blackwood)
1. The Kill Switch (2014)
2. War Hawk (2015)
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Novels
Subterranean (1999)
Excavation (2000)
Deep Fathom (2001)
Amazonia (2002)
Ice Hunt (2003)
Altar of Eden (2009)
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Novellas
The Devil’s Bones (2014) (with Steve Berry)
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Series contributed to
Indiana Jones (Films)
4. Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull(2008)
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Steven A McKay: The Abbey of Death (Review)

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Steven A. McKay was born in Scotland in 1977. His first novel, Wolf’s Head, was published in 2013 and went on to be an Amazon UK top-twenty bestseller. The Abbey of Death is the final story in the Forest Lord series. Steven is currently researching and writing a brand-new tale set in post-Roman Britain. He plays lead guitar and sings in a heavy-metal band when they can find the time to meet.

The Abbey of Death (Kindle Single) by [McKay, Steven A.]

He wanted to find peace in prayer, but some men serve God best with a sword in their hand.

Will Scaflock wants only to live in peace. He had more than his share of adventure when he went by the name Will Scarlet and fought corrupt authority alongside Robin Hood. Now widowed and alone, and estranged from his adult daughter, he has taken holy orders and sought refuge in a remote Benedictine abbey.

But even there, trouble and violence follow him. The abbot, John de Wystow, is a good man but a weak leader, and easily undermined by a faction of dissident monks. When the rebels, led by Brother Robert de Flexburgh, run riot in the local community—stealing, drinking, fornicating—Scaflock’s old instincts return. Reluctantly taking charge of the abbey’s moral defence, he finds himself embroiled in a series of fierce clashes with de Flexburgh’s rowdy gang.

As the abbey’s tranquillity is shattered, its cloisters stained with blood, Scaflock is forced to reconsider the direction of his life. Has he really left Will Scarlet behind him—or has he simply been running from reality?

Review

With each and every book in the forest lord series i have watched Steven A Mckay grow as a writer, both in style and confidence, until he has reached his latest point with The Abbey of Death. This tales shows a much more rounded tale steeped in confident writing and plot twists and misdirection. His characters continue to grow and coalesce into full realized and realistic personas making the book come alive. Will Scaflock being probably my favourite in the series , because he isn’t nice, he is rough and real and he has suffered. This book truly shows just how much he has suffered and how real he can be…. much to the horror of his attackers….

So with Abbey of Death, McKay brings down the curtain on the Forest Lord series, with his best work to date.

if that isnt worth £1.98…. well, im not sure what is.

(Parm)

 

 

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Anthony Riches: Onslaught (The second book in the Centurions series) Review.

Anthony Riches

Anthony Riches

began his lifelong interest in war and soldiers when he first heard his father’s stories about World War II. This led to a degree in Military Studies at Manchester University. He began writing the story that would become Wounds of Honour after a visit to Housesteads in 1996. He lives in Hertfordshire with his wife and three children

 

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Author Web Site

Onslaught (2017)
(The second book in the Centurions series)

 

book cover of Onslaught

Buy a Signed copy

The Rhine frontier has exploded into all-out war. The Batavi cohorts, so recently proud soldiers of Rome, have returned to their homeland, summoned by their new leader Kivilaz: they will be the spearhead of an audacious assault on Roman power.

Humbled by the rebels in a battle they should have won, the Romans retreat to their northern stronghold, the Old Camp, to lick their wounds. The 5th and 15th Legions grimly prepare to defend an undermanned fortress against both the Batavi and thousands of barbarian warriors intoxicated by a charismatic priestess’s vision of their victory.

Four centurions who once fought in the same army find themselves on opposite sides of a vicious civil war. For the Batavi, the prize could be freedom from Roman rule. For the Romans, the choices are victory or the most humiliating defeat their empire has ever known. And for one Batavi soldier, the greatest prize is simply survival in a battle with a cornered, desperate enemy.

Review:

Onslaught is Anthony Riches second book in his new Centurion series, for fans of his work, this series is a diversion from the insanely entertaining exploits of Marcus Aquila and the Tungrians in the Empire series.

Onslaught, like its predecessor Betrayal follow the hugely unsettled period of the Roman Empire when Emperors were two an penny and changed hands at the drop of a few legions being slaughtered. The latest book taking us to the point where Vitellius is now upon the throne, albeit perched on the edge and in no way feeling comfortable, because Titus Flavius Vespasianus has been acclaimed Emperor in the east, his legions are on the march, and his men are in true Roman fashion, double dealing and scheming across the empire. No one wants to be seen to support the wrong man. leaving the many men of the legions to bear the brunt and pay the bloody price of all the political maneuvering.

Taking advantage of all of this is Prince Kivilaz of the Batavi, under the aegis of insults to the tribe and ensuring the tribes future he has taken the fight to rebellion and attacked Rome via her encampments.

This rich backdrop of politics and battle is prime fodder for a writer of the skill and wit of Anthony Riches and one he exploits to the fullest. As you can expect (if you are a regular reader of his work) his characters explode to life as the story unfolds, keeping the reader fully engaged as the plot switches from Roman to Batavi perspective leaving you unsure who is the good guy and who is the bad, where should your reader loyalties sit?

This book and series explores deeper than just the camaraderie of the soldier and their deep ties to each other and their officers, it looks to the limits that a legion can be pushed or will accept and the limits a man can endure before his will finally breaks and he can fight no more. Interspersed as always with laugh out loud moments and the inevitable gallows humour of the men destined to die a bloody death very soon, and the more reflective moments of family, and friends and their loss, this is a book that spans not only events and people but also emotions. Antony Riches is now the undisputed master at this style of book, giving the reader a tale where no character is safe, no pages should be read unprepared because he can change pace or fully unfold some Machiavellian plot device at any moment. The ending of this book leaves me feeling that he has many such plots up his sleeve… and that the final book, Retribution will be a corker.

Onslaught is another fantastic new book in a series that is as Brutal and uncompromising as an enraged first spear, and should not be missed.

(Parm)

Series
Empire 
1. Wounds of Honour (2009)
2. Arrows of Fury (2010)
3. Fortress of Spears (2011)
4. The Leopard Sword (2012)
5. The Wolf’s Gold (2012)
6. The Eagle’s Vengeance (2013)
7. The Emperor’s Knives (2014)
8.Thunder of the Gods (2015)
9. Altar of Blood (2016)
The Empire Collection Books I-3 (omnibus) (2017)
The Empire Collection Books 4-6 (omnibus) (2017)
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Centurions 
1. Betrayal (2017)
2. Onslaught (2017)
3. Retribution (2018)
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Angus Donald: Blood’s Game (Review)

Angus Donald

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Angus Donald was born in China in 1965 and educated at Marlborough College and Edinburgh University.

He has worked as a fruit-picker in Greece, a waiter in New York and as an anthropologist studying magic and witchcraft in Indonesia.

For the past 20 years, he has been a journalist in Hong Kong, India, Afghanistan and London.

Author Website

Buy Signed copy

 

book cover of Blood's Game

THE THRILLING NEW SERIES FROM THE BESTSELLING AUTHOR OF THE ‘OUTLAW CHRONICLES’. PERFECT FOR FANS OF BERNARD CORNWELL AND CONN IGGULDEN. AFTER THE TUDORS CAME THE STUARTS . . . London, Winter 1670. Holcroft Blood has entered the employ of the Duke of Buckingham, one of the most powerful men in the kingdom after the king. It is here that his education really begins. With a gift for numbers and decoding ciphers, Holcroft soon proves invaluable to the Duke, but when he’s pushed into a betrayal he risks everything for revenge. His father, Colonel Thomas Blood, has fallen on hard times. A man used to fighting, he lives by his wits and survives by whatever means necessary. When he’s asked to commit treason by stealing the crown jewels, he puts himself and his family in a dangerous situation – one that may end at the gallows. As the machinations of powerful men plot to secure the country’s future, both father and son must learn what it is to survive in a more dangerous battlefield than war – the court of King Charles II.

Review

Angus Donald has managed over the last 8 years to provide us with one of the best modern retelling’s of Robin Hood that you could ever possibly want to read. When it finished what would come next?

Colonel Blood is not an unknown character to me, but he is very much a little known enigma for many readers…..

So how would Angus bring this man alive?

The answer is through his own trials and those of his family and the daring theft of the Crown Jewels. The key character for me in this book is his son Holcroft Blood. Angus Donald brings to life the time period and the people, the nasty conniving Buckingham with his privilege and power, a spoiled king and various sections of society from the theater to the slums of London. While Angus tells the history lightly, he also manages to weave the reader right into the immediate so you feel part of the story not a voyeur in a tale.

By the end of the story Holcroft Blood has become a new fav character, a young man different from his peers, but gifted and talented in many ways, with an honour that leads him into some strange situations. His friend Jack Churchill and he bring the story to a very satisfying and tense conclusion, in a book with action and humour aplenty, setting the scene for what i feel will be a truly excellent series in the future…. book two cannot come soon enough for me.

Bravo Angus…. loved this book

(Parm)

Series
Outlaw Chronicles
1. Outlaw (2009)
2. Holy Warrior (2010)
3. King’s Man (2011)
4. Warlord (2012)
5. Grail Knight (2013)
6. The Iron Castle (2014)
7. The King’s Assassin (2015)
8. The Death of Robin Hood (2016)
The Rise of Robin Hood (2013)
The Betrayal of Father Tuck (2013)
The Hostility of Hanno (2013)
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Blood 
1. Blood’s Game (2017)
2. Blood’s Revolution (2018)
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Paul Hoffman: Scorn (Review) Blog Tour

Paul Hoffman studied English at New College, Oxford before becoming a senior film censor at the British Board of Film Classification. He lives in the United Kingdom.

 

 

After an experiment at the Large Hadron Collider goes horribly wrong, depressed scientist Aaron Gall wakes up to discover his mind and body have undergone an astonishing transformation. Now bursting with the joys of life, he is inspired to undertake a radical new therapy: to talk to the priests who brutalised him and his school friends, point out the intellectual dishonesty and inhumanity of their religious beliefs – and then eat them. Aaron enjoys the process so much (as well as taunting the police and MI5) he decides to extend his murderous conversations to include the Archbishop of Westminster, recently converted Catholic Tony Blair, the Queen of England – and, finally, the Pope himself. But a Catholic Church that has given the world the Crusades, the Inquisition, and Papal Infallibility hasn’t survived for two thousand years without a reason. Aaron is in for the greatest shock in the history of mankind.

Review

When in 2010 Paul Hoffman burst onto the writing scene with The Left Hand of God i was beyond pleasantly surprised by the rich colourful and original world that had been created. The story was such an eclectic mix of real world names and fantastical armies and lands. With a protagonist that grew with the book, both in power and stature but also in age and experience. Sadly for me the series declined from that epic beginning (though they were still solid 3/5 books)

I wondered what had happened to this highly original and extremely engaging author, when out of the blue i was sent a review copy of Scorn. The cover alone just jumps out at you, again something new different and a bit irreverent.

As ever Paul Hoffman mixes the real with the fantastical, EG: the Queen, the Pope and Tony Blair to name some…. the latter who at one point has a long involved chat with a werewolf… yes i think that gives you an idea that this book has a level of insanity to it, but in every insanity is an element of genius, which once again exists in this book as it did in Left Hand, mix in walking the very fine line of irreverence/ blasphemy with the church which is something to be encouraged as too many authors shy away from pushing that boundary. Scorn has so much…. and yet unfortunately it fails to reach the heady heights that Left Hand of God did… close… but not quite. for me it squeaks a 4/5, which seems damning praise…. because i very very much enjoyed it… but i started and so will end comparing to that splendid book, Left hand of God, still the mans best work…. but if he keeps writing like this i think will even surpass it with this splendidly irreverent, crazy mind bending plot.

(Parm)

Series
Left Hand of God Trilogy
1. The Left Hand of God (2010)
2. The Last Four Things (2011)
3. The Beating of his Wings (2013)
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Filed under Fantasy, Paul Hoffman, Supernatural, Uncategorized

Michael Marshall Smith: Hannah Green and Her Unfeasibly Mundane Existence (Extract and review)

Michael Marshall Smith's picture

Michael Marshall Smith

Was born and raised — itinerantly — in the USA and the UK: his parents are academics. He has had two radio comedy series and a pilot TV series, and is currently working on screenplays for two feature films and the BBC adaptation of Clive Barker’s Weaveworld. Only Forward was his first novel, Spares his second. He is distressingly young.

book cover of 

Hannah Green and Her Unfeasibly Mundane Existence

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An unpredictable, poignant, and captivating tale for readers of all ages, by the critically acclaimed author of Only Forward.
There are a million stories in the world. Most are perfectly ordinary.

This one isn’t.

Hannah Green actually thinks her story is more mundane than most. But she’s about to discover that the shadows in her life have been hiding a world where nothing is as it seems: that there’s an ancient and secret machine that converts evil deeds into energy, that some mushrooms can talk and that her grandfather has been friends with the Devil for over a hundred and fifty years, and now they need her help.

The publishers have kindly allowed me to provide a small extract from the book….

Extract

Then

Imagine, if you will, a watchmaker’s workshop.

In fact, please imagine one whether you wish to or not. That’s where something’s about to happen, something that won’t seem important right away but will turn out to be – and if you’re not prepared to listen to what I’m saying then this whole thing simply isn’t going to work.

So.

Imagine that thing I just said.

If it helps, the workshop is on the street level of an old and crumbling building, in a town some distance from here. With the exception of the workbench it is cluttered and dusty. The watchmaker is advanced in years and does not care about the state of the place, except for the area in which he works.

It is a late afternoon in autumn, and growing dark. Quite cold, too. It is quiet. The workshop is dimly lit by candles, and the watchmaker – you can picture him in the gloom, bent over his bench, if you wish – is wearing several layers of clothing to keep warm. He is repairing a piece he made several decades ago, the prized possession of a local nobleman. It will take him perhaps half an hour, he estimates, after which he’ll lock up his workshop and walk through the narrow streets to his house, where since the death of his wife he lives alone but for an elderly and bad-tempered cat. On the way he will stop off to purchase a few provisions, primarily a bag of peppermints, of which he is extremely fond. The watchmaker. Not the cat.

The timepiece he is working on is intricate, and very advanced for its time, though the watchmaker knows that were he to embark upon crafting something like it now he’d do things quite differently. He has learned a great deal since he made it. He doesn’t make anything new any more, however. He hasn’t in a long while. The story of his life has already been told. He is merely waiting for its final line.

Nonetheless, his eyes remain sharp and his fingers nimble, and in fact it only takes ten minutes before the watch is working perfectly once more. He reassembles it, and polishes the outside with his sleeve. Finished. Done.

He stands with the piece in his hands. He is aware, through his profound understanding of its workings, of the intricate mechanisms involved in its measuring of time, the hidden movements. He feels these as a subtle, almost imperceptible vibration, like the murmur of a tiny animal cupped in his hand, stirring in its sleep.

And he is aware of something else.

Not one thing, in fact, but a multitude – a cloud filling his mind like notes from a church organ, soaring up towards heaven. He is aware of children, and a grandchild. They cannot be his, because he has none: his marriage, though long and comfortable, was without issue. Aware, too, of the people who had come before him, his parents and grandparents and ancestors, aware not merely of the idea of them but their reality, their complexity – as though he has only ever been the soloist in the music of his life, supported upon the harmonies of others.

He’s aware also that though the candles in the workshop illuminate small areas, there are patches of darkness too, and parts that are neither one thing nor the other. That his entire life has been this way, not forever pulled between two poles but borne instead along far more complex currents, of which ticks and tocks are merely the extremes.

How did he come to be standing here on this cold after­noon? he wonders. What innumerable events led to this?

And why?

He shakes his head, frowning. This is not the kind of thought that usually occupies his mind. He is not normally prey, either, to a feeling of dread – though that is what is creeping up on him now. Something bad is about to happen.

Something wicked this way comes.

He hears footsteps in the street outside. He half turns, but cannot see who is approaching. The windows are grimy. He has not cleaned them in many years. Nobody needs to see inside. His venerable name on the sign is advertisement enough, and as he has gradually withdrawn from the world so he has come to value the privacy the windows’ opaqueness confers.

But now suddenly he wishes he could see who’s coming. And he wonders whether his life is over after all.

He waits, turning back to the bench, busying his hands.

And the door opens.

No, no, no. Sorry. Stop imagining things.

I’ve got this completely wrong. I’ve tried to tell the story from the beginning.

That’s always a mistake. I’ve learned my lesson since, and have even come to wonder if this is what I was dimly starting to comprehend on that cold, long-ago afternoon. Life is not like a watch or clock, something that can be constructed and then wound for the first time, set in motion.

There is no beginning. We are always in the middle.

OK, look. I’m going to start again.

 

Review:

This book is the first time i have read Michael Marshall Smith and i honestly didn’t know what to expect. What i found was such a surprise, the prose/ narrative seemed to match the plot, in that Hannah thought she was living a mundane existence until she found out her Grandfather had been friends with the devil for over 250 years.

I found that Michael Marshall Smith played out his tale in a very matter of fact style, the normal, the every day and the mundane flowing along with the extraordinary happening as if we should almost not bat an eye, showing where the mundane is often so much more than that. The story has a lovely endearing way of showing how a young girl can deal with all that life throws at her both in the ordinary and fantastical, how she and kids in general can be so adaptable. The characterization in this book is sublime and was a true revelation, something that will make me read more of this authors work, his effortless (seemingly) ability to portray and make his characters real and believable is the winner for this book.

A fantastically dark  and funny book that will leave you pondering it for some time afterwards.

(Parm)

 

Series
Ememess Collection
1. Ememess Issue 1 (2012)
2. Ememess Issue 2 (2012)
3. Ememess Issue 3 (2012)
4. Ememess Issue 4 (2012)
5. Ememess issue 5 (2012)
6. Ememess Issue 6 (2012)
7. Ememess issue 7 (2012)
8. Ememess Issue 8 (2012)
9. Ememess Issue 9 (2012)
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Novels
Only Forward (1994)
Spares (1996)
One of Us (1998)
The Servants (2007)
Hannah Green and Her Unfeasibly Mundane Existence(2017)
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Collections
What You Make It (1999)
Binary 2 (2000) (with Kim Newman)
More Tomorrow (2003)
What Happens When You Wake Up in the Night (2009)
Swallowed By The Cracks (2011) (with S G Browne, Gary McMahon and Lee Thomas)
Everything You Need (2013)
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Chapbooks
The Vaccinator (1998)
Cat Stories (2001)
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Novellas
Diet Hell (2012)
Hell Hath Enlarged Herself (2012)
Being Right (2012)
A Convenient Arrangement (2012)
The Handover (2012)
The Man Who Drew Cats (2012)
Save As… (2012)
When God Lived In Kentish Town (2012)
The Seventeenth Kind (2012)
Autumn (2012)
Later (2012)
Missed Connection (2012)
Two Shot (2012)
The Dark Land (2012)
Enough Pizza (2012)
Everybody Goes (2012)
Maybe Next Time (2012)
More Bitter Than Death (2012)
This Is Now (2012)
The Fracture (2012)
Getting Over (2012)
A Long Walk, For The Last Time (2012)
Open Doors (2012)
To Receive Is Better (2012)
Substitutions (2012)
The Gist (2013)
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Anthologies containing stories by Michael Marshall Smith
Dark Voices 2 (1990)
Best New Horror 2 (1991)
Best New Horror 3 (1992)
Dark Voices 4 (1992)
Dark Voices 5 (1992)
The Year’s Best Fantasy and Horror Seventh Annual Collection (1994)
Dark Voices 6 (1994)
The Mammoth Book of Frankenstein (1994)
Shadows over Innsmouth (1994)
The Giant Book of Terror (1994)
The Best New Horror 5 (1995)
The Year’s Best Fantasy and Horror Eighth Annual Collection (1995)
Dark Terrors (1995)
The Best New Horror 6 (1995)
The Year’s Best Fantasy and Horror Ninth Annual Collection (1996)
The Mammoth Book of Best New Horror Volume Seven(1996)
Dark Terrors 2 (1996)
Twists of the Tale (1996)
Lethal Kisses (1996)
The Mammoth Book of Dracula (1997)
Dancing with the Dark (1997)
The Year’s Best Fantasy and Horror Tenth Annual Collection (1997)
Dark of the Night (1997)
Dark Terrors 3 (1997)
The Mammoth Book of Best New Horror Volume Nine(1997)
The Mammoth Book of Best New Horror Volume Eight(1997)
Scaremongers (1998)
Dark Terrors 4 (1998)
100 Twisted Little Tales of Torment (1998)
White of the Moon (1999)
The Year’s Best Fantasy and Horror Twelfth Annual Collection (1999)
999 (1999)
The Mammoth Book of Best New Horror Volume Ten(1999)
Foursight (2000)
The Year’s Best Fantasy and Horror Thirteenth Annual Collection (2000)
Dark Terrors 5 (2000)
The Mammoth Book of Best New Horror Volume Eleven(2000)
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Filed under Michael Marshall Smith, Supernatural